Fall of the Berlin Wall, 1989

Today, we celebrate the fall of the Berlin Wall 20 years ago. The fall of the Berlin Wall was the beginning of the end for communism, at least in Russia and Eastern Europe. Too bad it seems to be on the resurgence in America–Central, South, and these days, North.

I served in the US Army during the Cold War. I joined for many reasons, but among them was the hope they I would help bring down communism. I spent two years out of my four-year stint in the Army guarding nuclear-tipped Pershing II missiles in Germany. I served with a little-know Infantry unit know as the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry, or simply as 2-4. One of these days, I’ll do a longer post about my time in the Army and why I joined.

The picture below is of me at the Berlin Wall, circa October 1985. Note what I’m pointing at. Let’s hope one day Cuba can be as free as Germany is today.

The Berlin Wall, circa October 1985
The Berlin Wall, circa October 1985
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Castro Death Watch June 09 poll: vote now!

Fidel Castro recently accused the U.S. of using "torture." So, which of the following is worse?

  • Putting political prisoners into cells so small they can't stand, feeding them rancid, disgusting food (if and when they get fed at all), beating them and urinating on them when they're thirsty. (70%, 14 Votes)
  • Feeding Muslim prisoners healthy, nutritious food 3 times a day (prepared under religious guidelines), providing them with copies of the Koran, allowing them to pray and practice their religion. (30%, 6 Votes)

Total Voters: 20

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Misinterpretations

So many of us Cuban-Americans KNEW that when Raul Castro said he’d be willing to “talk” about anything with Obama, he was just blowing smoke:

“Affirming that the president of Cuba is ready to discuss any topic with the president of the United States expresses that he’s not afraid to broach any subject,” Fidel Castro wrote of his 77-year-old brother, who succeeded him 14 months ago.

“It’s a sign of bravery and confidence in the principles of the revolution,” he said.

“Nobody should assume that he was talking about pardoning those sentenced in March 2003 and sending all of them to the United States, if the country were willing to liberate the five Cuban anti-terrorist heroes,” Castro wrote.

We knew it, we knew it, we knew it.

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There’s more than meets the eye…

Babalu Blog posted a nausea-inducing photo of Obama shaking hands, and smiling with, Hugo Chavez.

Something, ahem, “interesting” happened during that handshake which is not visible in the photo. But you can see it in this photo:

Chavez hands Obama a book by a leftist author
Chavez hands Obama a book by a leftist author

The book, titled “Las Venas Abiertas de America Latina” (The Open Veins of Latin America), was written by a hardcore leftist from Uruguay named Eduardo Galeano. No doubt Obama will rush out to find an English-language version or, if none exists, have someone translate it for him.

Somebody please wake me up in November of 2012. Please.

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A Day for Heroes

Rick Rescorla is one the heroes of 9/11 you might not have heard about.  Originally from Britain, Rick served as an officer in the U.S. Army and he fought in the battle of Ia Drang Valley, the first major battle involving American troops in the Vietnam War and a battle made famous in the book and movie “We Were Soldiers, Once and Young.”

Rick was vice president of security for Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, a tenant of the World Trade Center, on September 11, 2001.  He was known as a bit of a harda**, putting the firm’s employees through their paces during his constant emergency drills.

But the drills paid off: he was able to evacuate nearly all of the company’s 3,700 employees when the planes hit the twin towers, saving their lives.  Tragically, and heroically, Rick went back into one of the burning buildings to rescue a couple of remaining stragglers.  It was then that building collapsed, killing him and countless others.

Read more about Rick here and here.   And never forget.

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